If you love the British sound, "False Memory Lane" is bread for your teeth

Allan Crockford has not only crossed the British scene of the last thirty years has helped to build it in the first person. His powerful musical kicks off in the first half of the eighties from the thriving scene of Medways with the seminal The Prisoners, formation of mold mod that actually anticipated Madchester, baggy movement and brit-pop with his soaked garage pop and psychedelia, becoming a model says for people like Tim Burgess and his Charlatans. Out of the life cycle of Prisoners, Crockford plunges into new musical adventures (The Solarflares, JTQ, Thee Headcoats), sometimes together with the companion Graham Day, the two become columns of The Prime Movers and The Solar Flares to summarize the various activities of of his career in the project Graham Day & The Forefathers, a sort of cover band of themselves.

Only in the third millennium, however, Crockford discovered the vein of the author and sketched the project The Galileo 7, which debuted in 2010 with "Are We Having Fun Yet?" And an encore in 2012 with the interesting "Staring At The Sound" . This brings us to the present day and the third act "False Memory Lane", to be released by the label "domestic" Fools Paradise. An album that reveals the growth style of Crockford and Associates, engaged in a collection of songs that blend power-pop and garage-rock influences and a paisley underground psychedelia that takes spatial boundaries, as indeed suggest the cover of the work and the name of the band, borrowed from an episode of Star Trek.

The risk of exceeding, however, is averted by a writing dry and certainly retromaniaca, but always on the piece and in step with the present day, as evidenced from the very outset "Do not Follow Me," to the tune of the kaleidoscope that lysergic 'organ teleports in space. "You're Not Dreaming" and "Nobody Told You" settled in the pop tradition albionica, not too far from the lesson of the Kinks and Small Faces to speak, while the enchanted atmosphere of "False Memory Lane" portray an intangible psychedelia sound.
The peak of the album lies in the wonderful uptempo "Do not Know What I'm Waiting For", a sort of cross between power-pop and college rock in the style of Rem of yesteryear: our piece of the moment. "Rising Tide's" plays on the successful duet guitar-organ failure, "Fools" is filled with reminiscences Beatles, highlighting once more the net - and in a sense inevitable - debt owed to the glorious national scene. They close the curtain chiaroscuro whispered à-la Jarvis Cocker of "Little by Little", yet another cosmic trip aftertaste.

If you love the British sound, "False Memory Lane" is bread for your teeth

Fabio Guastalla